Home Diet Excessive salt and low protein intake in the North Indian diet is linked to heart disease, kidney disease and diabetes.

Excessive salt and low protein intake in the North Indian diet is linked to heart disease, kidney disease and diabetes.

by doctor.ndtv.com
0 comment

Recent studies have highlighted that people in North India may be at risk of developing diseases such as high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, and chronic kidney disease.


Excessive salt intake may increase risk of several health conditions

The burden of non-communicable diseases is increasing not only in India but across the world. These include cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, kidney disease, and type 2 diabetes. Recent studies have highlighted that people in North India may be at risk of developing diseases such as high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, and chronic kidney disease.

Understand the key findings

Researchers from the George Institute for Global Health in India, in collaboration with the Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER) in Chandigarh, studied the dietary habits of people in northern India.

The results revealed that the dietary habits of North Indians may be the cause. According to this study, the intake of nutrients needed for cardiovascular and kidney health is suboptimal among people in North India. The study focused on excessive salt intake and intakes of potassium and protein below recommended dietary allowances. Men also had higher nutritional intake than women.

The study focused on sodium, potassium, phosphorus and protein intake, all of which influence the risk of developing non-communicable diseases.

“Poor nutritious diet is a major risk factor for non-communicable diseases (NCDs), which is a major public health concern. “It’s important to know exactly what nutrients you’re getting.” “High salt intake and low potassium intake point to the need to develop interventions that target individuals and society,” says George, India. said Vivekanand Jha, executive director of the Institute for Global Health and lead author of the study.

Encouraging individuals to eat a balanced diet may help lower risk. “We need to take action to correct nutrient imbalances and encourage people to eat healthier diets by increasing diversity,” added Professor Vivekanand Jha.

Tips for eating a balanced diet:

  • Read food labels and understand ingredients
  • Add different food groups including fruits, vegetables, grains, dairy, proteins, fats, oils, and more.
  • Be careful about salt and sugar intake
  • Monitor your daily calorie intake
  • Focus on micronutrient needs and add supplements as needed

Disclaimer: This content, including advice, provides general information only. It is in no way a substitute for qualified medical opinion. Always consult a specialist or your doctor for more information. NDTV is not responsible for this information.


You may also like

Leave a Comment

1

Today’s Diabetes News, your ultimate destination for up-to-date and insightful information on diabetes, health tips, and living a fulfilling life with diabetes. Our mission is to empower and support individuals with diabetes, their loved ones, and the wider community by providing reliable, relevant, and engaging content that fosters a healthier and happier life.

Interesting Topics

Most Viewed Articles

Latest Articles

Copyright MatchingDonors.com©️ 2024 All rights reserved.

Are you sure want to unlock this post?
Unlock left : 0
Are you sure want to cancel subscription?